Burke Library at Union Theological Seminary
 

Chinese Church of Christ in Korea records, 1908 -- 1975

Summary Information

Abstract

The Chinese Church of Christ in Korea was founded in 1912 by American missionary C. S. Deming, with Cheh Tao-hsin as one of the first elders of the church in Seoul and Li Kwohfeng as one of his first pastors, to address the increasing population of the Chinese in Korea. The collection contains reports, letters, research on Christian Education Mission Schools, facts sheets on human rights violations, and other materials.

At a Glance

Bib ID 6354185 View CLIO record
Creator(s) Chinese Church of Christ in Korea
Title Chinese Church of Christ in Korea records, 1908 -- 1975
Physical Description 0.25 linear feet (0.25 linear feet;1 box)
Language(s) English , Chinese .
Access

The collection is open for research.

Onsite storage.

Arrangement

Arrangement

The collection is arranged in one series, roughly by format.

Description

Scope and Contents

The collection contains historical information on the formation of the Chinese Church in Korea from its creation in 1912. Fact sheets, pamphlets, and indices of school names and other demographic data place the Chinese Church of Christ in the larger context of Protestant missionary work in Korea. News articles, programs, informational pamphlets, statistics and graphs contain evidence related to the founding and operation of the Church and missionary-run schools along with more general resources on Korean missionary efforts, school demographics, and resources for newcomers to Korea. Documents related to the foundation of the Church include the Constitution and minutes of the first meeting. Articles and reports, most of which are commissioned by the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions, and research from the committee of Christian Education Mission Schools chronicle the establishment and administration of church centers and schools. Correspondence excerpts include narrative history of the Church founding and operation and indices listing key members of the Church and missionary school community. A listing of Mission Stations in Korea dated 1915 includes Japanese spelling equivalents. More than thirty fact sheets on the socio-political condition of South Korea, specifically violation of human rights, are also found in this collection. The work of the Chinese Church of Christ in Korea proceeded against a backdrop of larger historical context, including references to riots and unrest that interrupted missionary work in 1931, and later with the advent of World War II [see folder 1].

  • Chinese Church of Christ in Korea records, 1908 -- 1975

    This series contains historical information on the formation of the Chinese Church in Korea from its creation in 1912. Fact sheets, pamphlets, and indices of school names and other demographic data place the Chinese Church of Christ in the larger context of Protestant missionary work in Korea. News articles, programs, informational pamphlets, statistics and graphs contain evidence related to the founding and operation of the Church and missionary-run schools along with more general resources on Korean missionary efforts, school demographics, and resources for newcomers to Korea. Documents related to the foundation of the Church include the Constitution and minutes of the first meeting. Articles and reports, most of which are commissioned by the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions, and research from the committee of Christian Education Mission Schools chronicle the establishment and administration of church centers and schools. Correspondence excerpts include narrative history of the Church founding and operation and indices listing key members of the Church and missionary school community. A listing of Mission Stations in Korea dated 1915 includes Japanese spelling equivalents. More than thirty fact sheets on the socio-political condition of South Korea, specifically violation of human rights, are also found in this collection. The work of the Chinese Church of Christ in Korea proceeded against a backdrop of larger historical context, including references to riots and unrest that interrupted missionary work in 1931, and later with the advent of World War II [see folder 1].

Burke Library record group:

Missionary Research Library Archives: MRL8, Korea

Using the Collection

Burke Library at Union Theological Seminary

Conditions Governing Access

The collection is open for research.

Onsite storage.

Conditions Governing Use

Some material in this collection may be protected by copyright and other rights. Information concerning copyright, fair use, and reproduction requests can be consulted at Columbia's Copyright Advisory Office.

Preferred Citation

Item description, MRL8: Chinese Church of Christ in Korea records, 1908-1975, box #, folder #, The Burke Library at Union Theological Seminary, Columbia University in the City of New York.

About the Finding Aid / Processing Information

Columbia University Libraries, Burke Library at Union Theological Seminary

Processing Information

Metal clips and staples were removed from materials and folded items were flattened. Materials were placed in new acid-free folders and boxes. The finding aid was created by Aram Bae in 2007, updated by Elizabeth Willse in 2014 as part of the Henry Luce Foundation grant, and edited by Leah Edelman in 2020.

Revision Description

2014-04-11 XMl instance created by Cecile Queffelec

2019-05-20 EAD was imported spring 2019 as part of the ArchivesSpace Phase II migration.

2020-07-07 EAD spot checked and corrected and description updated by Leah Edelman.

History / Biographical Note

Biographical / Historical

Conducting its first service at the Korean YMCA in May 1912, the Chinese Church of Christ was formed to meet the needs of the increasing population of the Chinese Christians living in Korea, which had reached about 18,000 by 1911. An American missionary born in China, C.S. Deming organized meetings for the creation of the Chinese church and was aided by Chinese Christians such as Cheh Tao-hsin and Li Kwohfeng. With its first church established in Seoul, the Chinese church added additional congregations in other areas such as Chemulpo, Pyengyang, Wonsan, Fusan, and Seishin.

Beginning with just a dozen people at its inception, in 1913 the Chinese church had an average Sunday attendance of about 40, with 22 boys and girls enrolled in the day school. The numbers increased steadily on an annual basis; by 1916 the average Sunday attendance was 60, with 43 enrolled in the day school. In the fall of 1929, Deming was succeeded by M.J. Quinn, a retired missionary from China. The Foreign Mission Boards of both the Presbyterian Council and Methodist Council worked together as a union mission to further the continuation of the Chinese Church of Christ in Korea.