Rare Book & Manuscript Library
 

Iakov Ivanovich Lisitsyn Correspondence, 1926-1931

Summary Information

At a Glance

Bib ID 4078554 View CLIO record
Creator(s) Lisitsyn, I︠A︡kov Ivanovich ; Tolmachev, Alekseĭ Sergeevich
Title Iakov Ivanovich Lisitsyn Correspondence, 1926-1931
Physical Description 4 items (1 folder)
Language(s) Russian .
Access

This collection is located on-site.

Arrangement

Arrangement

Arranged.

Description

Summary

Lisitsyn's correspondence consists of two letters dated 1926 and 1927 from Alekseĭ Sergeevich Tolmachev with Lisitsyn's carbon reply concerning the book "Dukhi i zhizn'" a collection of essays on Russian religious sects. There is also a pamphlet commemorating the fifth anniversary of the Circle of Russian Culture (Kruzhok dukhovnago obshchenii︠a︡) in 1929.

Using the Collection

Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Restrictions on Access

This collection is located on-site.

Ownership and Custodial History

Gift of the Harriman Institute, via Eugene Beshenkovsky, 1988.

About the Finding Aid / Processing Information

Columbia University Libraries, Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Processing Information

Correspondence Processed ejs 01/--/89.

Revision Description

2020-04-23 PDF removed. jg

Subject Headings

The subject headings listed below are found in this collection. Links below allow searches at Columbia University through the Archival Collections Portal and through CLIO, the catalog for Columbia University Libraries, as well as ArchiveGRID, a catalog that allows users to search the holdings of multiple research libraries and archives.

All links open new windows.

Subject

Heading "CUL Archives:"
"Portal"
"CUL Collections:"
"CLIO"
"Nat'l / Int'l Archives:"
"ArchivedGRID"
Kruzhok dukhovnago obshchenii︠a︡ (New York) Portal CLIO ArchiveGRID
Russians -- United States Portal CLIO ArchiveGRID

History / Biographical Note

Biographical sketch

I︠A︡kov Ivanovich Lisitsyn was a Russian emigre, active in the Circle of Russian Culture (Kruzhok dukhovnago obshchenii︠a︡) which was founded in 1924 to fill the cultural needs of the Russian emigre community in New York.