Burke Library at Union Theological Seminary
 

Albert Barnes papers, 1840 -- 1859

Summary Information

Abstract

Albert Barnes was a Presbyterian minister in Philadelphia involved in the New School/Old School dispute, whose experience influenced the founding of Union Theological Seminary in New York, where he was on the Board of Directors from 1840-1870. This collection contains 29 manuscript sermons.

At a Glance

Bib ID 6958378 View CLIO record
Creator(s) Barnes, Albert, 1798-1870
Title Albert Barnes papers, 1840 -- 1859
Physical Description 0.5 linear feet (0.5 linear feet; 1 box)
Language(s) English .
Access

This collection is open for research.

Onsite storage.

Arrangement

Arrangement

This collection is organized in one series, arranged numerically according to the numbering system used by Barnes.

Description

Scope and Contents

This collection contains 29 manuscript sermons, numbered and titled by Barnes, with dates reflecting use of the sermons. Sermons are written in ink, with notes, cancellations, and marginalia. Barnes burned a number of his sermons towards the end of his life; the sermons in this collection were saved due to an intervention by Fanny M. Gibbs.

  • Albert Barnes papers, 1840 -- 1859

    This series contains 29 manuscript sermons, numbered and titled by Barnes, with dates reflecting use of the sermons. Sermons are written in ink, with notes, cancellations, and marginalia. Barnes burned a number of his sermons towards the end of his life; the sermons in this collection were saved due to an intervention by Fanny M. Gibbs.

Burke Library record group:

Union Theological Seminary Archives: UTS 1, papers of faculty and students

Using the Collection

Burke Library at Union Theological Seminary

Conditions Governing Access

This collection is open for research.

Onsite storage.

Conditions Governing Use

Some material in this collection may be protected by copyright and other rights. Information concerning copyright, fair use, and reproduction requests can be consulted at Columbia's Copyright Advisory Office.

Preferred Citation

Item description, UTS1: Albert Barnes papers, 1840-1859, box #, folder #, The Burke Library at Union Theological Seminary, Columbia University in the City of New York.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

George Lewis Prentiss donated Barnes' sermons to The Burke Library before 1897, having received them from Fanny M. Gibbs. Albert Barnes had been persuaded by Fanny M. Gibbs to give her these remaining sermons, when she discovered that he was destroying his whole collection.

About the Finding Aid / Processing Information

Columbia University Libraries, Burke Library at Union Theological Seminary

Processing Information

Materials were placed in new acid-free folders and boxes. The finding aid was created by Lisa Fishman in 1997, revised by Ruth Tonkiss Cameron in 2008, and updated and edited by Leah Edelman in 2021.

Revision Description

2021-07-26 PDF converted to EAD and description updated by Leah Edelman.

Subject Headings

The subject headings listed below are found in this collection. Links below allow searches at Columbia University through the Archival Collections Portal and through CLIO, the catalog for Columbia University Libraries, as well as ArchiveGRID, a catalog that allows users to search the holdings of multiple research libraries and archives.

All links open new windows.

Subject

Heading "CUL Archives:"
"Portal"
"CUL Collections:"
"CLIO"
"Nat'l / Int'l Archives:"
"ArchivedGRID"
Barnes, Albert, 1798-1870 -- : Archives Portal CLIO ArchiveGRID
Presbyterians -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia Portal CLIO ArchiveGRID
Sermons, American Portal CLIO ArchiveGRID

History / Biographical Note

Biographical / Historical

Rev. Albert Barnes was born in Rome, Oneida County, New York on Dec. 1, 1798. He completed preparatory studies at Fairfield Academy, Connecticut, and graduated from Hamilton College in July 1820. After attending Princeton Theological Seminary, he was ordained on Feb. 8, 1825, and installed as pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Morristown, NJ. Five years later, Barnes succeeded the Rev. James Patriot Wilson as pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia. The division within the Presbyterian denomination between the "Old School" and the "New School" resulted in a struggle for control of the church, and in 1831 a heresy charge by the Presbytery of Philadelphia against Barnes went before the General Assembly. Barnes's call was sustained by a New School majority, but in 1835 the publication of his new commentary on Romans resulted in a renewed campaign against him; his opponents pressed charges from Presbytery to Synod. When UTS founders first met in October, 1835, in New York, Barnes's right to preach had been suspended by the Synod of Philadelphia, and this situation helped to fuel the New School Presbyterians' desire to found a new seminary in the city. In 1836, the Synod of the General Assembly reversed Barnes's suspension. In 1851 he was named Moderator of the General Assembly, and he helped shape its antislavery sentiment and its strong position in favor of temperance reform. His active ministry in Philadelphia continued until 1867, when, due to failure of his sight, he resigned his charge and was made Pastor Emeritus. Yet he continued to preach in the House of Refuge, of which he was a manager, and sat continuously on the Board of Directors of UTS from 1840 until his death on December 24, 1870, often traveling between the two cities. In 1867 he delivered the first course of lectures at UTS on the Ely Foundation, on the Evidences of Christianity in the Nineteenth Century, which were later published.