Rare Book & Manuscript Library
 

James Thomson Shotwell papers, 1896-1962

Summary Information

At a Glance

Call No.: Ms Coll\Shotwell
Bib ID 4079335 View CLIO record
Creator(s) Shotwell, James T., 1874-1965
Title James Thomson Shotwell papers, 1896-1962
Physical Description 296 boxes (60000 items)
Language(s) English .
Access

Reader must use the microfilm copy of the Beer Diary.

The following boxes are located off-site: AA, AAA, 1-296. You will need to request this material from the Rare Book and Manuscript Library at least three business days in advance in advance to use the collection in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library reading room.

Arrangement

Arrangement

This collection is arranged in 2 series Series I: Correspondence and Manuscripts; Series II: Subject Files

Description

Summary

Correspondence and other documents relating to the Paris Peace Conference, League of Nations, and Locarno Pact with which Prof. Shotwell was associated. There is material relating to Shotwell's THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE WORLD WAR, as well as to his other writings.

Using the Collection

Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Restrictions on Access

Reader must use the microfilm copy of the Beer Diary.

The following boxes are located off-site: AA, AAA, 1-296. You will need to request this material from the Rare Book and Manuscript Library at least three business days in advance in advance to use the collection in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library reading room.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. The RBML maintains ownership of the physical material only. Copyright remains with the creator and his/her heirs. The responsibility to secure copyright permission rests with the patron.

Preferred Citation

Identification of specific item; Date (if known); James T. Shotwell papers; Box and Folder; Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University Library.

Alternate Form Available

Microfilm available of the Beer Diary and of the contents of the speeches and writings folder in Box AAA.

About the Finding Aid / Processing Information

Columbia University Libraries, Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Processing Information

Cataloged Christina Hilton Fenn 09/--/89.

Revision Description

2009-06-26 File created.

2014-02-27 XML document instance created by Catherine C. Ricciardi

2016-03-29 XML document instance updated by Catherine C. Ricciardi

2017-02-23 Finding Aid revised by Vianca C. Victor

2019-05-20 EAD was imported spring 2019 as part of the ArchivesSpace Phase II migration.

Subject Headings

The subject headings listed below are found in this collection. Links below allow searches at Columbia University through the Archival Collections Portal and through CLIO, the catalog for Columbia University Libraries, as well as ArchiveGRID, a catalog that allows users to search the holdings of multiple research libraries and archives.

All links open new windows.

Subject

Heading "CUL Archives:"
"Portal"
"CUL Collections:"
"CLIO"
"Nat'l / Int'l Archives:"
"ArchivedGRID"
College teachers Portal CLIO ArchiveGRID
League of Nations Portal CLIO ArchiveGRID
Locarno Conference (Location of meeting: Locarno, Switzerland). Date of meeting or treaty signing: (1925 :.) Portal CLIO ArchiveGRID
Paris Peace Conference (Date of meeting or treaty signing: (1919-1920).) Portal CLIO ArchiveGRID
World War, 1914-1918 Portal CLIO ArchiveGRID
World War, 1914-1918 -- Economic aspects Portal CLIO ArchiveGRID
World War, 1914-1918 -- Social aspects Portal CLIO ArchiveGRID
World politics Portal CLIO ArchiveGRID

History / Biographical Note

Biographical Note:

James T. Shotwell, Bryce Professor of the History of International Relations at Columbia University, devoted most of his life, as he put it, "to the organization of peace." Considering the period his life spanned — he died at 90 in 1965, having studied and taught at Columbia for nearly 50 years — this was no small project. He was present at, indeed instrumental in, the creation of some of the most important international institutions of the twentieth century. He believed that his was the beginning of a new era, a time in which rapid technological advances demanded new conceptions of how states resolved their differences. Both in his scholarship and in his constant, restless button-holing of the rich and powerful around the world, he argued that in the modern world peace is not merely the absence of war but something that needs to be planned and organized. He did all he could to encourage that organization, and in doing so he helped provoke an entirely new academic field — international relations — and proposed many of the policies and instruments by which governments today approach management of their common affairs.