Rare Book & Manuscript Library
 

David Stoelting papers, 1994-2012

Summary Information

Abstract

The David Stoelting papers focus on events leading to the adoption of the 1998 Rome Statute creating the International Criminal Court ("ICC") and the early years of the ICC's operation. It also includes materials related to task forces and committees of lawyers examining the post-9/11 war on terror, military commissions, and the issue of solitary confinement and international human rights. Three boxes relate to Stoelting's research on Africa and the ad hoc tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda.

At a Glance

Bib ID 14414195 View CLIO record
Creator(s) Stoelting, David
Title David Stoelting papers, 1994-2012
Physical Description 39.2 Linear Feet (10 document boxes and 28 record cartons)
Language(s) English .
Access

Material is unprocessed. Please contact rbml@columbia.edu for more information.

This collection is located off-site. You will need to request this material at least three business days in advance to use the collection in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library reading room.

Arrangement

Description

Scope and Contents

The Stoelting papers contain documentation on the development and early operation of the ICC, but also includes materials on ad hoc international criminal tribunals for Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia, and documentation of Stoelting's work with a number of American Bar Association and New York City Bar Association committees and task forces focused on the ICC and the post-9/11 war on terror. The International Criminal Court has been a central structure in the implementation and application of international human rights law and international criminal justice. Founded through the adoption of the 1998 Rome Statute, which entered into force in 2002, the ICC has jurisdiction over the investigation and prosecution of individuals for international crimes against humanity, genocide, war crimes, and crimes of aggression. Stoelting's papers provide unique documentation of the processes surrounding the founding and operation of the ICC, especially the advocacy roles of the American Bar Association and the New York City Bar Association. Stoelting was also centrally involved in the creation and early years of the International Criminal Bar, an organization created to train and support defense counsel and the rights of defendants before the ICC.

International non-governmental human rights organizations (including those whose records RBML holds, i.e. Human Rights Watch and the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights) were directly involved in the establishment of the ICC, which was seen as an important structural element of the modern human rights movement, especially in the wakes of the genocides in the former Yugoslavia and in Rwanda. This collection documents the networks and collaboration across the human rights movement in the establishment of the ICC. Part of that advocacy concerned the position of the United States, which signed the Rome Treaty in 2000 but never ratified it and has offered varying levels of criticism and support over the years to the prosecutorial work of the ICC.

Stoelting's collection also includes boxes of materials related to task forces and committees of lawyers examining the post 9/11 war on terror, military commissions, and the issue of solitary confinement and international human rights. Three boxes related to Stoelting's research on Africa and on ad hoc tribunals in the former Yugoslavia and in Rwanda are also included.

Using the Collection

Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Conditions Governing Access

Material is unprocessed. Please contact rbml@columbia.edu for more information.

This collection is located off-site. You will need to request this material at least three business days in advance to use the collection in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library reading room.

About the Finding Aid / Processing Information

Columbia University Libraries, Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Revision Description

Subject Headings

The subject headings listed below are found in this collection. Links below allow searches at Columbia University through the Archival Collections Portal and through CLIO, the catalog for Columbia University Libraries, as well as ArchiveGRID, a catalog that allows users to search the holdings of multiple research libraries and archives.

All links open new windows.

Subject

Heading "CUL Archives:"
"Portal"
"CUL Collections:"
"CLIO"
"Nat'l / Int'l Archives:"
"ArchivedGRID"
Human rights Portal CLIO ArchiveGRID
International Criminal Court Portal CLIO ArchiveGRID

History / Biographical Note

Content Description

David Stoelting (b. 1958) is a trial lawyer based in New York City. For several decades, Stoelting was involved in various capacities with the creation of the ICC and with efforts to create support for the ICC in the United States. Since the 1980s, Stoelting has also written and lectured on topics including terrorism, military tribunals, international criminal justice and human rights, solitary confinement and African politics.